Tag: Dr. Joanne Lynn

What We Know to Do Won’t Be Done and Wouldn’t be Enough! (But We Could Make Eldercare Work!)

Portrait of Dr. Joanne Lynn

by Joanne Lynn Our aging society is a mountain to be moved – a large collective challenge we have to tackle together. Problem is, right now we’re using shovels when bulldozers would hardly do the job. The mountain is reforming how eldercare is delivered and funded. We’ve allowed so many forces to converge over the

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Interim Reports on Aggregating Care Plans to Manage Supportive Care Services for Elders

By Les Morgan The following reports were produced as deliverables for our project “Aggregating Care Plans to Manage Supportive Care Services for Elders” (Joanne Lynn, M.D., Principal Investigator).This project is funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation through Grant GBMF5662 to Altarum Institute. Dr. Lynn will provide a more detailed report on the project

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Dr. Joanne Lynn Speaks on the Eldercare Crisis

Politico interviewed Dr. Joanne Lynn to learn how much strain younger Americans face as their elders age, and were surprised to learn that immigration could ease the crisis. The aging of the Baby Boom generation will triple the number of Americans over age 80 — a bulge demographers have seen coming for decades. Yet, American

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MediCaring Communities Proposal Shows Substantial Savings in Medicare Costs

New York, New York, July 5, 2016—A new financial simulation for a novel model of care, called MediCaring Communities, has shown significant Medicare savings for frail older adults who need both medical care and nonmedical support services. Medicare savings ranged from $269-$537 dollars per person per month, depending on the community, its past patterns, and

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Innovation Requires Shedding Established Patterns

While diligently trying to improve care for frail elders, often by filling gaps in the care system, even our most innovative programs tend to work within the constraints that created those gaps in the first place. Dr. Joanne Lynn, Director of the Center for Elder Care and Advanced Illness (CECAI), has been visiting and often

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The Case for Care Plans

Posted on behalf of Dr. Joanne Lynn Patients and policy makers must require that clinicians communicate effectively with patients and families, not only to plan for death but also to develop a care plan that guides healthcare services through to end of life. Discussing clinical circumstances and their probable course, understanding the patient’s goals and

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Family Caregivers Need Care, Too

Family caregivers are the infrastructure upon which the lives and well-being of millions of frail elders rest. Without their presence, and without their filling in healthcare gaps to coordinate and manage care for their loved ones, whole segments of the healthcare industry would simply collapse. Although caregivers can find the experience of helping others to be

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Building Outrage: Mad as Hell—and Then What?

The worlds of frailty, caregiving, and geriatrics tend to be a women’s world—men grow old, but women grow even older. Although more men are now acting as family caregivers, the high-touch, hands-on work continues to land mostly on women. The eldercare workforce teams with women, from direct care workers to geriatricians. For all that we

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Multidisciplinary Teams Essential to MediCaring Work

The MediCaring team of healthcare providers must reflect and address the array of medical and social services frail elders need. However one labels the team– multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary or trans-disciplinary—its key focus must be to deliver an integrative approach based on a care plan developed in collaboration and with the elder and her family. Such a

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Paying The Price: Frailty is an Expensive Phase of Life

As millions of Americans reach old age, millions will experience the frailty that accompanies that time phase of life. And that price, really, can be a sticker shock when writ large over the lives of millions. People over the age of 65 account for a fair amount of the nation’s healthcare costs. For example, 13%

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